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About Acrodermatitis Enteropathica (AE) in Ophthalmology

What is Acrodermatitis Enteropathica (AE) in Ophthalmology?

Acrodermatitis Enteropathica (AE) is a rare inherited disorder of zinc metabolism that affects the skin, hair, nails, and eyes. It is characterized by a red, scaly rash on the hands and feet, alopecia (hair loss), and nail dystrophy (thickening and discoloration of the nails). Ophthalmologically, AE can cause conjunctivitis, corneal ulceration, and photophobia. Treatment involves zinc supplementation and avoidance of zinc-deficient foods.

What are the symptoms of Acrodermatitis Enteropathica (AE) in Ophthalmology?

In ophthalmology, the symptoms of Acrodermatitis Enteropathica (AE) include:

-Corneal ulceration
-Corneal neovascularization
-Corneal scarring
-Corneal thinning
-Corneal edema
-Corneal vascularization
-Corneal opacity
-Corneal vascularization
-Corneal vascularization
-Corneal vascularization
-Corneal vascularization
-Corneal vascularization
-Corneal vascularization
-Corneal vascularization
-Corneal vascularization
-Corneal vascularization
-Corneal vascularization
-Corneal vascularization
-Corneal vascularization
-Corneal vascularization
-Corneal vascularization
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What are the causes of Acrodermatitis Enteropathica (AE) in Ophthalmology?

Acrodermatitis enteropathica (AE) is a rare inherited disorder caused by a deficiency of zinc in the body. It is characterized by a rash on the hands and feet, as well as hair loss, diarrhea, and poor growth. In ophthalmology, AE can cause vision problems such as photophobia, blepharitis, and corneal ulcers. It can also lead to decreased visual acuity, strabismus, and nystagmus.

What are the treatments for Acrodermatitis Enteropathica (AE) in Ophthalmology?

1. Vitamin A supplementation: Vitamin A supplementation is the mainstay of treatment for AE. It is usually given in the form of oral retinoids, such as isotretinoin or acitretin.

2. Topical corticosteroids: Topical corticosteroids may be used to reduce inflammation and itching.

3. Antibiotics: Antibiotics may be prescribed to treat any secondary bacterial infections.

4. Phototherapy: Phototherapy may be used to reduce inflammation and itching.

5. Surgery: Surgery may be necessary to repair any damage to the eyelids or cornea caused by AE.

What are the risk factors for Acrodermatitis Enteropathica (AE) in Ophthalmology?

1. Genetic predisposition: AE is caused by a genetic mutation in the zinc transporter gene SLC39A4.

2. Malnutrition: AE is caused by a deficiency in zinc, which can be caused by inadequate dietary intake or malabsorption of zinc.

3. Immunodeficiency: AE can be caused by an underlying immunodeficiency, such as HIV or AIDS.

4. Medications: Certain medications, such as diuretics, can interfere with zinc absorption and lead to AE.

5. Age: AE is more common in infants and young children.

Is there a cure/medications for Acrodermatitis Enteropathica (AE) in Ophthalmology?

Yes, there are medications available to treat Acrodermatitis Enteropathica (AE). The most common medications used to treat AE are zinc supplements, which are taken orally. Other medications that may be used to treat AE include topical steroids, antibiotics, and antifungal medications. Additionally, some ophthalmologists may recommend the use of artificial tears or lubricants to help reduce the symptoms of AE.